Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, 1980 to 1995
Read Online
Share

Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, 1980 to 1995

  • 886 Want to read
  • ·
  • 64 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey in Lincoln, NE .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Aquifers -- High Plains (U.S.),
  • Groundwater -- High Plains (U.S.),
  • High Plains Aquifer.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesWater level changes in the High Plains aquifer, 1980 to 1995., USGS science for a changing world.
Statementby Virginia L. McGuire and Jennifer B. Sharpe.
SeriesFact sheet -- FS-068-97., Fact sheet (Geological Survey (U.S.)) -- FS-97-068.
ContributionsSharpe, Jennifer B., Geological Survey (U.S.)
The Physical Object
Pagination[4] p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18112121M

Download Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, 1980 to 1995

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, to [Reston, Va.?]: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Geological. The pattern of water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer from to (view a high-resolution PDF map) is based on measurements from 5, wells (table 1).Areas with substantial water-level declines from predevelopment to in southwestern Kansas and northwestern Texas continued to decline from to Get this from a library! Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, to [Virginia L McGuire; Jennifer B Sharpe; Geological Survey (U.S.)]. WATER-LEVEL CHANGES, to Figure 1. Water-level changes in the High Plains aquifer, to , and areas with 50 to feet and to feet of water-level decline in the High Plains aquifer, predevelopment to U.S. Department of the .

Water-level change in the High Plains aquifer, to The High Plains aquifer underlies one of the major agricultural areas in the world in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. Nearly 30 percent of the ground water used for irriga-tion in the United States is pumped from the High. This data set consists of digital water-level-change contours for the High Plains aquifer in the United States, to The High Plains aquifer, which underlies about , square miles in parts of eight states, is the principal water source in one of the nation's major agricultural areas. Area-weighted, average water-level changes for the aquifer were declines of feet from to , feet from to , feet from to , and foot from to Estimated changes in water in storage were declines of million acre-feet from to , million acre-feet from to , million.   The U.S. Geological Survey has released a new report detailing changes of groundwater levels in the High Plains aquifer. The report presents water-level change data in the aquifer for two separate periods: from – the time prior to significant groundwater irrigation development – to , and from to

Water-level change in the High Plains aquifer underlying parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming results from differences in recharge from precipitation and ground-water withdrawals for irrigation. From the beginning of irrigation development () to , water levels declined in several areas, and exceeded feet in parts of the Central. The Ogallala Aquifer (oh-guh-LAH-luh) is a shallow water table aquifer surrounded by sand, silt, clay, and gravel located beneath the Great Plains in the United States. One of the world's largest aquifers, it underlies an area of approximately , sq mi (, km 2) in portions of eight states (South Dakota, Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Texas). The Ogallala Aquifer, or High Plains Aquifer, is a vast yet shallow aquifer located beneath the Great Plains in the United States. One of the world's largest aquifers, it lies under about , mi² (, km²) in portions of South Dakota, Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Texas. It was named in by N.H. Darton from its type locality near the town of.   Detailed Description. High Plains aquifer water-level changes, predevelopment (about ) to Figure 1 from USGS SIR Details. Image Dimensions: x